Breaking Futures: Imaginative (Re)visions of Time

We are issuing a Call for Proposals for scholarly and creative submissions for an international, interdisciplinary graduate student conference entitled “Breaking Futures: Imaginative (Re)visions of Time,” to be held at Indiana University, Bloomington on March 26-28, 2015. Join us for the 13th annual conference hosted by the graduate students of the IU Department of English.

Conceptualizations of the future can simultaneously direct and disrupt the way we live, work, and plan for what’s next. “Breaking Futures” invites scholars from the humanities, sciences,education, law, and public health to explore the diverse meanings of the future across texts, methodologies, and time periods. How do some futures “break” by intruding on the present? How are others “broken:” interrupted, reformed, or altogether destroyed? Why do some futures disappear while others become ubiquitous? What generates our expectations, fears, and hopes about the future, and how do these affects change over time? How do genre, discipline, and methodology impact representations of, expectations for, and prescience regarding the future?What do local, national, and global futures look like from the vantage point of higher education’s shifting landscape?

We invite proposals for individual papers as well as panels organized by topic. We also welcome the interaction of scholarly and creative work within papers or panels.

Please submit (both as an attachment AND in the body of the email) an abstract of no more than 250 words along with a few personal details (name, institutional affiliation, degree level, email, and phone number) by December 15th, 2014, to iugradconference@gmail.com. Below are some suggestions for possible topics affiliated with our conference theme. This list is by no means exhaustive, and we welcome submissions engaged with other subject matters.

  • Futurescapes
  • Biological & environmental futurism
  • Deep time
  • The longue durée
  • The anthropocene
  • Periodization and periodic/epistemic breaks
  • Post-raciality/black pessimism
  • Afrofuturism
  • Queer futurity
  • Disabled futurity & crip time
  • Reproductive futurity
  • Techno-futurism
  • Transhumanism
  • Post-feminism/structuralism/colonialism/modernism/humanism/gender
  • Science fiction & cyberpunk
  • Retrofuturism
  • Memory & dreams
  • Eschatology
  • Premeditation
  • Political revolution & reform
  • Monumentalization
  • Social-scientific projection & mathematical modeling
  • The future of the university
  • STEM to STEAM

Studying With: Relation and method in the technoscientific field

Studying With: Relation and method in the technoscientific field

Since Laura Nader (1972) suggested that anthropologists turn their attention “up,” using the ethnographic gaze to bring powerful informants down to size, the anthropology of expertise has been entwined with concerns about the politics of method. The anthropology of scientists, engineers and other experts raises new forms of classic methodological questions: How should we understand the relationship between explanations offered by anthropologists and those offered by their interlocutors? How should ethnographers respond to the practical, political, and epistemic problems raised by the idea that our role is to explain what is “really” going on? Anthropologists have proposed a variety of concepts to address these questions, from “polymorphous engagement” (Gusterson 1997), to “lateral reason” (Maurer 2005) and “collateral knowledge” (Riles 2011), to the “found para-ethnographic” (Holmes and Marcus 2005).

Following this year’s call to “examine the truths we encounter, produce and communicate through anthropological theories and methods,” this panel brings together a set of researchers engaged with the practical and conceptual difficulty of studying technoscientific knowledge practices ethnographically. When engineers claim anthropological objects like “culture” as their own, when fieldwork may involve traveling just across campus, or when access hinges on convincing interlocutors of the commercial merit of ethnography, anthropology’s trademark reflexivity and charitable interpretations face new challenges. Drawing on recent and ongoing fieldwork experiences, these papers propose and explore novel modes of relation between the knowledge practices of anthropologists and those they study, building on work in the anthropology of expertise and science and technology studies.

We are looking for one or two papers to round out the panel. If you are interested in joining us, please reply to nseaver@uci.edu expressing your interest by this Friday, April 11th.

Producing Design: Ethnographies of Inequality and Difference in Digital Technologies

Producing Design: Ethnographies of Inequality and Difference in Digital Technologies
Organizers: Jordan Kraemer (UC Irvine/UC Berkeley) and Angela VandenBroek (Binghamton University, SUNY)

Please contact us if you’re interested in participating, and send proposed abstracts of 250 words to Jordan (jordan@jordankraemer.com) on or by April 7.

Technology companies have long been attentive to interface and interaction design, and are increasingly focused on “user experience,” that is, how humans interact with computing devices, products, and other humans. Although ethnographic and other qualitative research methods are now commonplace in corporate and design settings, fewer anthropological studies examine technology design (broadly conceived) in constructing inequality and cultural difference. With the current 2010s tech boom, startups and established companies alike are generating a profusion of new applications, hardware, architectures, and systems. Many of these will be implemented in diverse settings around the globe, albeit in uneven ways. This panel brings together anthropological studies of this unevenness, to address cultural inequalities in user interface and technology design. Recent commentators in the media, for example, have pointed out that tech innovators in places like Silicon Valley design platforms and services mainly for urban elites, like themselves often young, white, male, and technically savvy. Scholarly critics, moreover, seek to trouble utopian visions of technology diffusion by calling attention to the complexity of relations between tech companies, developers and designers, users, states, institutions, and material infrastructures (e.g., Morozov 2011; also Star 1999)—even as these actors often overlap.

Anthropologists and scholars in related fields have studied design and designers for some time, and have contributed to the development of design practices (e.g., Drazin 2012; Suchman 2011). Others focus on emerging forms of digital labor (Ross et al. 2010), especially in relation to value. In this panel, we investigate different ways emerging technologies and their design depend on culturally and geographically specific norms that inform interaction design, to contribute to an ongoing anthropology of design in digital contexts. How does design, especially user interface design, shape experiences of sociality, mobility, personhood, affect, value, or labor? How do designers and users (often the same people) contend with affordances and accommodations of interfaces conceived for elite or dominant subjects? From digital media to Internet-enabled household objects and “wearables,” technologies designed in particular places (whether California, London, Stockholm, Berlin, Shanghai, or Brazil) circulate transnationally and become integrated into daily practices in diverse locales. We follow Lucy Suchman’s call to locate technologies and their design in particular places, while attending to new forms of placemaking they entail.

Topics of particular interest include the anthropology of computing and user interfaces, interaction design, communications infrastructure, online “content creation” and social media, digital forms of labor, surveillance and privacy, crowdsourcing and microwork, big data and algorithms, and issues of space, place, and scale.

Digital technology, transparency, and everyday forms of political engagement

Digital technology, transparency, and everyday forms of political engagement. CFP for 2014 AAA.

Do digital media enable us to see more clearly or accurately than other forms of media? What forms of knowledge, meaning, and/or matter do they make more transparent, and for whom? In which cases do they increase trust and intimacy and in which do they obscure the dynamics of social relationships? What do digital media obscure and how?

These are some of the questions we hope to ponder in this panel on digital technology, transparency, and everyday forms of political engagement. In the global South, in particular, government administrations and civic and community organizations have formed to promote the idea that “going digital” will lead to greater political clarity – i.e., transparency – and eliminate both graft and mundane human error. Capitalizing on the post-Cold War global euphoria for greater openness, and governance built on sharing “information,” digital technology and “transparency” have become indelibly linked, as the former is expected to bring about the latter, itself described as both a desired end of and means to achieve “good governance.”

In this panel we hope to consider the “thingness” or materiality of digital technology in concert with its dialectical opposite: the “seen through.” What are the social, cultural, and technical operations and arguments through which digital technology, on purpose or by oversight, enables us to see…or not? What are the effects of this (non)seeing? Possible topics for discussion include: – the production and circulation of new visual media and the creation of new digital publics – citizen engagement with open data projects – the social production, circulation, and use of crowdsourcing software (esp open source) – the construction, management, and operation of data holding structures – the labor of laying fibre optic cables or transporting lithium, etc.

We call on panelists to consider how the representational and the material, the transparent and the opaque, the seen and the unseen are entangled in historically specific moments and culturally specific locales. At the same time, we urge panelists to consider how particular digital transparency claims and/or projects resonate with those formed in other times and places, and collectively contribute to broad transnational political visions, projects, and movements. We thus welcome proposals from all geographical areas. If you are interested in being on our panel please send an abstract of 250 words or less with your name and institutional affiliation by April 5 to poggiali@stanford.edu and dmahoney1@usf.edu.

Thanks, Dillon Mahoney, University of South Florida, and Lisa Poggiali, Stanford University

Localities: Science and Technology in Places, Spaces, and Times

Localities: Science and Technology in Places, Spaces, and Times is a Graduate Student Conference in STS at York University, May 3-4 in Toronto.

The Science & Technology Studies Program at York University announces the forth annual graduate student conference. This year’s theme, Localities, challenges us to consider how places, spaces and times take active roles in shaping the science and technology we research, and our research of science and technology. As places, spaces and times create boundaries, the concepts surrounding them are something considered and vigorously debated within STS. Their definition and construction reflect the social nature of the ways science is conducted, technologies developed, and the manner in which both are disseminated, debated, and considered, both publicly and within their respective communities. What are the localities created by such boundaries, in which science and technology and their subsequent consideration and debate reside? Do they reside within them at all, or are the very idea of localities, within which science and technology and the discourse surrounding them takes place, even something that exists or something that needs to be considered? This year’s graduate student conference looks to explore these bounded localities, hoping to bring attention to the various realms, in which science and technology reside, and to encourage discussion on how the tangible and intangible is presented across localities, as well as
how they impact individuals and communities.

We invite papers from graduate students from all areas of the humanities and social sciences that will inspire, challenge, and stretch personal assumptions, academic categories, and pedagogical approaches to the practices of STS. This conference provides an excellent opportunity to share research as well as to meet other like-minded up-and-coming academics and researchers.

We welcome contributions on the following topics:
• Education, Pedagogies and Methodologies of Locality • Public Dimensions of Science & Technology
• Science & Technology in Academic Localities • Science & Technology in Nature and Space
• Science & Technology in Fiction and Media • Technicalities of Science & Technology
• Extraordinary Localities • Embodiment and Identities • Material Dimensions
• Policies, Regulations, Law • Political Localities • Historical Localities
• Localities / (Con-)Temporalities • Thinking and Making • Multispecies Ethnography

Submission & Registration
Please submit a maximum 350-word abstract, which includes your name, affiliation, year of study, and e-mail address to STS2014@yorku.ca.
Deadline: March 31, 2014.
Please go to our website yorkustsgradconference2014.wordpress.com for further details.

Digital Research Hub

I woke up this morning with an idea that I would like to run by the members of DANG.  Wouldn’t it be great if there was a central website anthropologists (and other scholars interested in human research with an online component) could all announce and advertise their digital/online research through.  The site would have 4 main components: announcement of new and on going digital research projects; requests for online participants; announcements of publications (hard copy, electronic, and of course OA!) relating to digital research; and announcements of conferences and calls for papers relating to digital research.  The site would be set up to automatically advertise all its postings over social media and scholars would be able to share links to the announcements with relevant groups.   Each scholar who submitted an announcement would be widening their audience and the audience of scholars would become better informed of current digital research.  Additionally, as a central hub of scholarship, the site would lend more credibility to any requests for participation.  Although, admittedly, that would mean a bit more supervision on the end of the site’s moderators and editors.

Now, of course this could already exist in the infinite space of the Internet, but if so my Google searches didn’t turn anything up.  The closest I got was this cool site that is a directory of online research tools. http://dirt.projectbamboo.org/

If this site doesn’t already exist, I’m wondering if DANG would be interested in sponsoring it, at least in name and possibly in terms of volunteers for editors?  We can secure the domain name digitalscholars.org for $18, which I think we could raise through Wikipedia style user donations.  I’m not entire clear on the money issue of things, but I would recommend any extra money raised via donations be turned over to DANG if possible to used for future projects or meetings.

I’d love feedback on this idea in the comments or via email slyeager@smu.edu

Call for Papers: Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics

DANG Call for Papers

Deadline April 10th (To Meet April 15th AAA Deadline for Sessions)

Email Abstracts to sydneyyeager@gmail.com

Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics: #Digital Publics, #Ethics, #Methods, #Insights

The future publics, which anthropologists of the 21st Century will engage with, occupy a social space in which the digital and the physical overlap.  Therefore, ethnographic study of these future publics merits consideration of the corresponding and relevant digital social spheres.

In light of this year’s conference theme “Future Publics, Current Engagements,” this panel intends to demonstrate how digital anthropologists are currently engaging with and researching “digital publics.”   This panel will highlight the current engagements of anthropologists conducting field research which bridges the overlap between digital publics and physical public spaces.  This panel strives to foster a discussion of the methods, ethics, and insights that Digital Anthropology can offer for “engaging with future publics” as digital technology continues to become a part of the everyday lives of the people anthropologists study around the world.  Major questions include: How do anthropologists collect and analyze data while doing digital field work?   What are the ethical issues facing anthropologists who rely on visual data and texts collected in the digital publics of the internet (social networking sites, forums, websites, etc)?  How does digital anthropology intersect with the physical as people increasingly act in physical space in response to the digital realm?  What kind of “future publics” are being constructed through today’s “current engagements” by users and anthropologists in the cyberspatial plazas of the internet (social networking sites, etc.)?

Furthermore, as digital technology continues to become a part of the everyday lives of the people anthropologists study, what insights can Digital Anthropology offer the broader discipline for “engaging with future publics”?  A discussion of ethnographic examples and evidence of the interactions between digital/online and physical life is pertinent to both the future of anthropological engagements with the public and to current concerns about digital studies in anthropology.

Building off goals established in the first organizational meeting of the newly formed Digital Anthropology interest group (DANG), this panel will address critical questions relating to the methods and ethics of digital fieldwork.  Presenters will demonstrate the applicability of insights, drawing from their current engagements with digital publics to advance the discipline of anthropology and prepare anthropologist for engagement with future publics.

Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics: #Digital Publics, #Ethics, #Methods, #Insights

DANG Call for Papers

Deadline April 10th (To Meet April 15th AAA Deadline for Sessions)

We are seeking presenters with papers which will address questions of ethics in digital anthropology.   We want to include papers which demonstrate innovative methods solutions to issues particular to digital fieldwork.  Papers with findings and insights applicable to digital anthropology and the future of anthropology as a whole are strongly encouraged.  We are particularly interested in having papers that discuss the overlap and interactions between digital/online and the physical.   We invite presenters to submit paper abstracts pertinent to the themes outlined above; however, we do not wish to limit abstracts to strictly these themes.  

We invite abstracts of 250 words to be submitted by April 10, 2013 to sydneyyeager@gmail.com  Look for email confirmation.